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Artemis I: The SLS rocket is on the platform but there’s a new delay: Storm Nicole arrives!

Will it be the right time? Hopefully, if only to silence critics and conspiracy theorists who see mysterious and hidden reasons behind every delay. In fact, a task like Artemis I presents so many variables and problems to solve that any simple mistake can be an insurmountable obstacle. If you then put weather or other external elements into it, it becomes more complicated and you will understand how easy it is to accumulate delays.

We don’t want to do that, so we’re not going to say it’s the right time, and just report some clues: The SLS rocket is back on the e . launch pad Everything is ready for mid-November, when the first mission around the moon will be attempted since the time of the Apollo program. But there are already negative developments and a confirmed delay, here is the news in the latest update.

The latest developments

Here is a small summary of what happened in the past few weeks. Many will remember that engineers had to return the rocket to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) on September 26, before Hurricane Ian passed near the launch area and after two previous launch attempts were cancelled. The first dates back to August 29 due to a faulty temperature sensor, and the second occurred on September 4, when a liquid hydrogen leak was identified during the fuel refill mechanism.

Loss was finally avoided after repairs and updated tanks procedures were implemented. Once the missile entered the VAB, the teams performed standard maintenance to repair minor damage to the thermal protection system and recharge or replace the batteries throughout the system.

According to NASA, the rocket is now ready to take on the long journey that includes a round-the-moon round and back to Earth with a landing in the vicinity of the Orion capsule.

A new try: here are the times to decide

Now that it’s a file November 16 Getting closer and closer, NASA not only confirmed the day but also set the times. Thus, we discover that NASA wants to take advantage of A 69-minute launch window opens at 06:07 a.m.According to our time zone. So let’s see what times to note those who intend to follow all developments from first contact to start.

  • November 12 at 01.00: Pre-departure briefing featuring Mike Sarafin, Artemis Mission Manager, NASA Headquarters, Charlie Blackwell Thompson, Artemis Launch Manager, Earth Exploration Systems Program, Kennedy, Emily Nelson, Flight Director, NASA Johnson and Melody Lovin, Meteorologist, Delta 45 Space Launch American.
  • November 12 at 18.00: The second briefing with Jeremy Parsons, Deputy Director of the Earth Exploration Systems Program, NASA Kennedy and Melody Lovin, Meteorologist, United States for the Delta 45 launch.
  • November 13 at 8.30 pm: start tank operations (load propellant).
  • November 14 at 03:30: Live beta launch begins
  • 16 November 07.04 launch: Originally, the 69-minute window was supposed to open at 6am on November 14th, but according to a recent update, Tropical Storm Nicole forced NASA to review its plans. New hours anticipate opening 2-hour launch window starting at 07:04 on November 16. This would lead to a comeback with Splashdown scheduled for Friday 11th December. If needed, NASA has a specific backup launch opportunity for Saturday, November 19, and even if that is ignored, other launch opportunities will be considered until November 27.

As on other occasions, the event can be followed live via NASA Live TV, the official web page and social channels of the US Space Agency. The schedule is not very convenient for us, but you will find all the updates on the HDblog pages. Of course, we can’t rule out more delays and NASA has predicted the launch will take place between November 12 and 27 as a deadline. More details in the coming days.

Update: Storm Nicole delays the mission

09/11

The Artemis I mission really does seem charming, at least from a meteorological point of view given the recent developments from NASA. Tropical New Storm nicknamed Nicole represents the thousandth threat to the flight, so it was decided to postpone the operation again from November 14 to a candidate date of November 16.

There is currently no specific timetable but only an approximate, which provides for the opening 2-hour launch window starting at 07:04 on November 16. This would lead to a comeback with It is not expected that this will happen before Friday 11 December. If needed, NASA has a specific backup launch opportunity for Saturday, November 19, and even if that is ignored, other launch opportunities will be considered until November 27.

Based on forecast weather conditions, it was decided that the safest option was to keep the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and Orion spacecraft safe on the platform, while waiting for the storm to subside.

The SLS missile is designed to withstand winds of up to 136 km/h and current expectations are that the launch pad should be safe. The rocket is also designed to withstand heavy rain and all of its component elements are designed to prevent water intrusion, so once the storm is over, everything should run smoothly.

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